Healthy Woman

Many factors affect an individual’s overall health and wellness, including nutrition, exercise, and body weight as well as predispositions to a number of health conditions. However, women face additional health circumstances and challenges such as pregnancy, menopause and other gynecological conditions. In order for a woman to achieve optimal health and wellness, it is important for her to understand how her unique genetic profile may be affecting how her body utilizes energy and nutrients, as well as how it responds to certain foods, diets, and exercise regiments. A woman’s genetic makeup can also provide with insights into common health conditions that she may predisposed to, as well as other information that may be helpful during a woman’s lifetime.

Learn More

Mental Health

When it comes to psychiatric medications and dosages, one size doesn’t fit all. And the process of experimenting with various medications and dosages can take time, cause negative side effects and require expensive and reoccurring trips to the physician and pharmacy. Through genetic testing, you and your physician can determine the most effective treatment plan for you.

Learn More

Healthy Weight

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over one-third of U.S. adults are obese as defined as having a body mass index (BMI) above 30. Being at an unhealthy weight increases an individual’s risk of developing many serious health conditions, including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. Fortunately, obesity is reversible with close monitoring of nutrition and appropriate exercise. In addition, an individual’s genetic makeup can influence how his/her body utilizes energy and nutrients, responds to exercise and medications, and affects the risk of developing certain health conditions.

Learn More

Carrier Screening

Each person has two copies of the genetic materials, one copy inherited from each parent. Many genetic diseases are recessive, meaning the disease is caused by inheriting a mutation at the same DNA location from both parents. If a parent carries a mutation in one of the two copies of the DNA, he/she is a carrier of the genetic disease.

A carrier has a 50% chance of passing the same mutation to the child. If both parents are carriers, the child will have a 25% chance of inheriting both copies of the mutation, thus leading to the development of the genetic disease. Some inherited diseases are more common in certain ethnic groups and in people with a family history of genetic disorders.

Learn More